Venezuelan doctors demand government allow humanitarian aid

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Medicine and food sent by the United States has been blocked for three days on the border in Cucuta, Colombia after Venezuelan soldiers closed a bridge linking the two countries.

Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro led military exercises on Sunday, pledging to strengthen the country's anti-aircraft defensive system.

Maduro's supporters and far-left radicals in the United States have speculated since Guaidó's inauguration that the USA may stage a military intervention in the Latin American country, an option Trump himself has repeatedly maintained remains "on the table".

Guaido asked supporters to participate in a mass mobilization, saying it may be up to the people to bring the aid into the country.

The U.S. provided the aid and the Colombian government helped ensure its transport to the border, but the opposition is charged with handling the aid's distribution within Venezuela. "This is a crime against humanity, men of the armed forces", Juan Guaido said. Out with his threats.

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And he reasoned that the line "about providing for people " unwilling to work " has been walked back completely". The proponents of the deal aim to phase the country off fossil fuels and nuclear energy in 10 years.

Trump has not ruled out USA military action for Venezuela, but has not specified under what circumstances he would send in US forces.

The military exercises will last until February 15 and are set to become the most major and important drills that Caracas has held over its 200 year-old history, according to Maduro.

The United States was the first to recognize Guaido as the president of Venezuela, followed by Canada, and many Latin and European nations.

The State Department has repeatedly dismissed the possibility of using the military a a first resort against Maduro and, as noted by Andres Oppenheimer of the Miami Herald, "some USA analysts have estimated that invading Venezuela would take more than 100,000 US troops".

Guaido, the 35 year-old head of the opposition-controlled National Assembly, stunned Venezuela in January by declaring himself interim president after the legislature declared Maduro a "usurper" following his May 2018 reelection in a vote disputed by the opposition and worldwide community.

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