CEO quits after vegetative patient has baby

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The source added the patient required around-the-clock care and many would have access to her room.

A Phoenix police spokesman told The Washington Post that the department is investigating but did not release details about the case.

On Dec. 29, with help from one of the facility's nurses, the patient gave birth to a healthy baby boy, KPHO reported.

The woman's identity has not been reported, and it's not known if she has a family or a guardian. It is also unclear if staff members at the Hacienda de Los Angeles facility were unaware of the pregnancy until the birth.

In the statement, Gary Orman, Executive Vice President of the board for Hacienda Healthcare, vowed that the organization "will accept nothing less than a full accounting" of the incident.

The CEO of the Arizona nursing facility where a woman recently gave birth, despite being in a vegetative state for over a decade, has resigned. Employees did not know that the patient was pregnant. "Trust has definitely been broken", Cesena said of the Hacienda facility.

Sex abuse investigation underway after a patient in vegetative state for almost a decade gives birth.

The announcement came a day after the company's CEO resigned following reports that the woman, left in a persistent vegetative state for almost a decade after a near-drowning, had borne a child.

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How about the Mayor of New York City take care of the people that was born here, like the ones that are sleeping on our streets. The emergency room is the "default health care provider for so many people in this country", de Blasio said.

She said no one reported that incident exclusively out of fear, and she believes there's been other abuse throughout the years. "While federal and state privacy laws prohibit us from publicly discussing a patient's health or case, Hacienda has and will continue to cooperate fully with law enforcement and all the relevant regulatory agencies regarding this matter".

The facility, which has room for over 50 patients, is now under investigation by police and the Arizona Department of Health Services.

Hacienda almost lost its Medicare funding in December 2013 after Arizona Department of Health Services (ADHS) found at least one staff member was abusive to multiple patients while several staff members were deficient in reporting patient allegations of abuse by staff.

Protocol at the clinic has been changed, the source said, and men now have to be accompanied by a woman on entering the room of a female patient.

Hacienda describes itself as Arizona's "leading provider of specialised health care services for medically fragile and chronically ill infants, children, teens, and young adults as well as those with intellectual and developmental disabilities".

Since the news of the incident broke, parents of patients at the Phoenix-based health care facility have come forward, expressing their concerns.

That staff member was ultimately terminated, but the state found that the facility "failed to ensure clients. were treated with dignity".

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