Slender Man stabbing accused were 'delusional', Wisconsin court told

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A detective who interviewed a 12-year-old girl stabbed repeatedly in a Wisconsin park in 2014 has testified that one of two classmates accused of attacking her had been scaring her with stories about the fictional horror character Slender Man before the attack. All three girls were 12 years old at the time of the stabbing, three years ago.

"She would have an uphill road", McMahon said.

Weier, now 15, pleaded guilty in August to being a party to attempted second-degree intentional homicide.

Weier told investigators she and Geyser believed they had to kill Leutner or else Slender Man would kill them and their families.

A defense psychologist Thursday testified that Weier suffered from a shared delusional disorder.

Together they became obsessed with Slender Man, developing a condition called shared delusional disorder, McMahon said. A supplication understanding required her to put in no less than three years in a mental doctor's facility if judged rationally sick, and 10 years in jail if not.

He also pointed out that Weier told a detective she wasn't frightened of Slender Man until after the attack, when Geyser told her she had made a deal with the monster that he would spare their families if they killed Leutner. McMahon said Weier had agreed that she will not petition for release from a mental health institution for at least three years.

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Both girls have pleaded not guilty on grounds of mental illness.

Smith described Weier as a loner who struggled to fit in with her classmates and who found a friend in Geyser.

Weier's dad William said his daughter went through a hard time after his divorce. 10 of the 12 members voted that Weier could not be held responsible for her crime.

Prosecutors argued differently, the AP reported, saying Anissa and friend Morgan Geyser "knew this was wrong, they understood what they were doing was wrong".

Weier and her friend, Morgan Geyser, were charged with attempted first-degree homicide in the May 2014 stabbing of their classmate in Waukesha, a Milwaukee suburb. A decision by 10 out of 12 jurors is needed for a conclusive verdict.

"She knew the difference between right and wrong, but even so, she could not stop herself at the moment that mattered most because she was convinced that this character who was a fantasy in our minds today was not a fantasy but was real in her mind and that he would kill her and kill her family", said Dr. Gregory Van Rybroek.

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