Prince Charles in Gambia for first leg of Africa trip

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Meanwhile, Camilla, who is President of the Women of the World Festival, will attend an event featuring Ghana's top female leaders.

Charles and his wife Camilla are now are now on their second day of a five stay in Ghana during their tour of West Africa.

They arrived to a welcome ceremony at Jubilee House where they met President of Ghana, Nana Addo Dankwa Akufo-Addo and the First Lady, Rebecca Akufo-Addo.

In contrast, Prince Charles does not appear to have the same kind of relationship with his younger siblings, Princess Anne, Prince Andrew and Prince Edward.

The British Royals would on Saturday visit the Asantehene Otumfour Osei Tutu II at the Manhyia palace and subsequently visit the Christianborg Castle which was once owned by the British.

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On his first visit to the Gambia, Prince Charles will on Thursday visit the Medical Research Council in Banjul, a center specializing in the fight against malaria. "Some of them were happy, some of them not so happy".

A statement by the ministry's spokesperson, George Edokpa, said the British Royalty and delegation will be received on arrival by the minister of Foreign Affairs, Mr. Geoffrey Onyeama, along with the minister of the Federal Capital Territory, Alhaji Muhammed Musa Bello. This will be The Duchess of Cornwall's first visit to Nigeria.

Earlier this week, Camilla was credited with bringing the "sparkle" back to Prince Charles' eye in an intimate magazine article, which gave an inside glimpse at the couple's marriage like never before. The visit solidified Ghana and the United Kingdom's strong ties, and proved that the two nations are more than diplomatic allies, they're friends.

Ghana is the ninth country to enter into the Commonwealth, an intergovernmental organisation comprised of 53 member states that are mostly former territories of the British Empire.

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