Xbox game streaming revealed as Project xCloud

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That's why the company will be opening up the service to developers so they can start getting used to the idea of making games that are playable on console, PC or mobile devices.

The future of gaming just came a step closer, as Microsoft announces its new streaming service that lets you play Xbox games on the go.

Now You: Is game streaming the next big thing after console gaming?

Microsoft today revealed Project xCloud, a game streaming service that would bring the company's games to multiple devices, including mobile.

Despite the somewhat hyperbolic name, xCloud looks to be pretty impressive given it will push Xbox and Microsoft Store games to an all manner of devices from consoles and PCs to mobile gadgets. Microsoft has been working on this for a while already.

Public tests of Microsoft Project xCloud are set to begin in 2019. Tests are now being run with recent and upcoming games at Microsoft, and data centers have been supplied with a "new customizable blade that can host the component parts of multiple Xbox One consoles".

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It's not yet clear how fast your connection will need to be to enjoy a seamless gaming experience, but Microsoft says 4G and 5G connections will be supported.

Today, the games you play are very much dictated by the device you are using. That means that when Project xCloud does get released, there will be enough geo-located regions covered.

While a lot of work has already gone into the project, the technology is still in its infancy, and Microsoft is predicting a "multi-year journey" before it's ready for consumers.

Like other, similar services, most of the heavy lifting will be handled by remote hardware so that your device of choice can handle games beyond its solo capabilities. But even then, data caps present further issues to players using phones and tablets to stream data using broadband cellular network technology.

We've architected a new customizable blade that can host the component parts of multiple Xbox One consoles, as well as the associated infrastructure supporting it.

Microsoft's game streaming service makes Xbox games available on non-Xbox devices.

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