Starbucks, citing environment, is ditching plastic straws

Adjust Comment Print

The coffee company announced Monday that it will phase out plastic straws from all of its stores by 2020.

The strawless lid has already been in use at numerous company's stores for certain kinds of cold drinks like cold foam and "draft nitro", the coffee drink that comes out of a keg, mixed with nitrogen. Straws, though, will still be available - made from paper or compostable plastic.

Wes Knopp, the owner of Lone Light Coffee, said, "I think a majority of people would not get a plastic straw if they weren't provided with one automatically". Plastic straws never completely decompose and can be harmful, even fatal, to animals that ingest them.

To comply with the July 1 plastic straw ban, Starbucks stores in Seattle are offering customers new compostable straws, splash sticks and cutlery.

In the United States, local governments are already putting similar restrictions into place.

'I was less nervous in round two'
The 13th-seeded Raonic was playing John Millman of Australia as he bids to reach the third round for a sixth straight year. Romanian 29th seed Mihaela Buzarnescu thrashed British teenager Katie Swan, 6-0, 6-3 to extend her remarkable renaissance.

Starbucks said the conversion will be complete by 2020. In May, the European Union also suggested a ban on some plastic items, including straws.

According to a release, Starbucks said the lid is now available in more than 8,000 stores in the US and Canada for select beverages, including Draft Nitro and Cold Foam.

The announcement comes a week after Seattle, where the coffee house is headquartered, became one of the first high-profile cities in the U.S.to ban straws.

Sixteen Tampa Bay businesses have received national Ocean Friendly certification through the coalition by voluntarily banning foam products and plastic bags, only providing straws and to-go utensils upon request, and enforcing recycling programs.

"Plastic straws that end up in our oceans have a devastating effect on species", said Erin Simon, director of sustainability research & development and material science at World Wildlife Fund, US, in a statement.

Comments