Two-thirds of baby food tests positive for arsenic

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A study by the Clean Label Project has revealed two-thirds of baby food in United States has tested positive for arsenic and other risky toxins. The chemicals found in baby food and formula can affect babies' development, including fine motor skills and cognition, pediatrician and toxicologist at Children's Mercy Hospital in Kansas Jennifer Lowry said, USA Today reported.

In a study released on Wednesday, Oct. 25, Clean Label Project tested baby food, toddler drinks and snacks, and infant formulas that were bought over the past five months. While most samples contained only trace amounts of the toxins, some exceeded the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recommendations by up to six times. All of these chemicals pose potential dangers to developing infants. Additionally, 60 percent of the product that claimed to be BPA free actually tested positive for BPA.

Gerber, Organix and Earth's Best were among some of the worst brands, according to the study.

According to the Clean Label Project, 36 percent of the items it examined tested positive for lead, 58 percent tested positive for cadmium, and 10 percent tested positive for acrylamides, a potentially toxic chemical compound.

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The FDA had previously looked into the impact of arsenic in rice-based baby foods and even rice puffs.

"It is important for consumers to understand that some contaminants, such as heavy metals like lead or arsenic, are in the environment and can not simply be removed from food", said Peter Cassell, an FDA spokesperson. "There are a lot of troubling news stories about arsenic in baby rice cereal and lead in water, as well as pesticides, antibiotic resistance and additives in foods", Clean Label Project wrote on its site.

"It is important for consumers to understand that some contaminants, such as heavy metals like lead or arsenic, are in the environment and can not simply be removed from food", Peter Cassell, a FDA spokesperson.

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