House intel committee will release Russian-funded Facebook ads

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Washington D.C. [United States], Oct 12: The United States House of Representatives' Intelligence Committee will release the copies of Facebook ads purchased by Russian groups during the 2016 US presidential race.

The committee, one of the main congressional panels investigating allegations of Russian meddling, recently received more than 3,000 politically divisive ads believed to have been purchased by Russia. She said the company had been too permissive at times in terms of how advertisers are allowed to target users, and that Facebook did not want to allow ads that may be "discriminatory".

Sandberg did say that Facebook and Congress would release data on the Russian ad targeting when they release the ads to the public next month.

"My personal advice is that we will do that as quick as we can", said Rep. Mike Conaway, the top GOP lawmaker leading the probe, when asked if the committee plans to release the ads.

The Sandberg discussion is part of a growing feeling in the CBC that lawmakers need to draw the line with technology companies who they say are neglecting matters that hurt people of color on their platforms and within their companies.

Sandberg made the trip to Washington D.C.to inform U.S. lawmakers about progress in Facebook's internal investigation into the Russian adverts on the site.

"Things happened on our platform in this election that should not have happened", Sandberg said in an interview in Washington with Axios news that was broadcast on its website. Russian Federation apparently took advantage of controversies surrounding Hillary Clinton [the email scandal that rocked her campaign], and further dug in with the said ads bought from some Silicon Valley giants.

According to sources at Google, the ads on its various platforms, which include Gmail, YouTube and its Double Click ad network, were not purchased by the same Russian entity that bought the ads on Facebook.

Inside view of the Australian team bus with shattered glass
While Cricket Australia is certain that it was an attack when they were travelling back from the stadium to the team hotel. Australia are scheduled to play India in the third and final Twenty20 of the series in Hyderabad on Friday.

She and two other Facebook executives, Erin Egan and Elliot Schrage, also met privately with Representative Jackie Speier, a California Democrat and member of the House Intelligence Committee.

Sandberg acknowledged that the company had erred in how it handled the issue of foreign interference previous year.

"We take reports of misuse of our platform seriously".

Sandberg said it was important to protect "free expression" on Facebook and that if the Russian ads had been bought by legitimate accounts instead of fraudulent ones, many would have been allowed to run on the site.

She also criticized Twitter's decision this week to remove a campaign video from Republican Representative Marsha Blackburn, who is running for Senate in Tennessee.

Sandberg's comments come a day after the outgoing boss of the UK's media regulator, Dame Patricia Hodgson, said both Google and Facebook were publishers in her view.

All three companies have been asked to testify publicly about Russian interference before both the House and Senate intelligence panels on November 1.

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