This blooper reel from SpaceX's rocket tests is explosively entertaining

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While we may be used to watching SpaceX successfully land its Falcon 9 rocket boosters on land and sea, the company wasn't always so successful.

SpaceX has put together a bloopers video showing "How NOT to land an orbital rocket booster".

If you watch the reel, several self-deprecating jokes ("look, that's not an 'explosion, ' it's an unscheduled disassembly") accompany footage of smoking wrecks and explosions in the sky.

"You are my everything", Musk tells the rocket in the video. One particularly devastating scene shot in April 2015 shows a rocket landing slightly off-kilter causing it to fall slowly to the ground before instantly exploding on impact.

One of the best ways to do that, the company figured, was to stop throwing away the first stages of its rockets.

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In a tweet Thursday morning, Musk said, "Long road to reusability of Falcon 9 primary boost stage..."

Who knew a video without explosions could be even more satisfying than one with them?

This SpaceX blooper video is a good example of what Musk meant back then. But since the hard work of the team resulted in success, Musk will surely be proud to share this journey (with a mix of humor) with fans. In November, the company plans to launch its biggest usable rocket system, the Falcon Heavy, and then follow it up with carrying NASA astronauts in 2019.

Full rocket reusability is an essential part of SpaceX's plans for Mars, too. It's where the majority of the engines are found - in the case of SpaceX's Falcon 9 rocket, there are nine engines in that first stage. It is among the few private and government ventures that aim to carry cargo and people to the Red Planet and other places beyond Earth's atmosphere.

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