Utilities in US Southeast restore power to almost half hit by Irma

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Eric Silagy, the CEO of Florida Power & Light, said Irma caused the most widespread damage in the company's history.

In Georgia, utilities reported over 1.2 million customers without power Tuesday morning.

That's what Gus Beyersdorf, 40, and his colleague Nick Jensen, 32, utility workers from Wisconsin, found out while inspecting power lines in Florida on Monday.

FPL, the state's largest utility, said its outages dropped to around 1.9 million customers on Wednesday from a peak of more than 3.6 million on Monday. FPL said on Tuesday it planned to restore power to eastern Florida by this weekend and to western Florida by September 22. He believes southwest Florida is the most impacted but cautions that numbers may rise as "Irma hasn't left".

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"I have nowhere to put his insulin", said Wilcox.

Some Florida utilities, including FPL, warned customers it could take weeks to restore power in the hardest hit areas because infrastructure systems in some of those places will need to be rebuilt.

"It took a week for Matthew", Jensen said, referring to a hurricane that a year ago did not make landfall in Florida but caused power outages. The state's emergency management officials said the storm cut power to more than 6.5 million account holders across the state as of Monday afternoon. Other big power utilities in Florida are units of Emera Inc and Southern Co, which also operates the biggest electric companies in Georgia and Alabama. Both reactors at its Turkey Point facility, about 30 miles (48 km) south of Miami, remained shut early Tuesday, while both reactors at its St. Lucie plant, about 120 miles (190 km) north of Miami, were operating at full power.

They plan to spend the next two weeks working to restore power to millions affected by Hurricane Irma.

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