Why Trump Denounced the Left-Wing Group Antifa

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Alt-right. "Alt-left." Antifa. The list goes on.

Mitt Romney on Tuesday rejected President Donald Trump's statement "both sides" were responsible for the violence in Charlottesville, Va.

Two prominent supporters who have worked with the Trump team - speaking on condition of anonymity so as not to antagonize the president - say they worry the self-inflicted Charlottesville controversy will only make it harder for the White House to get tax reform, health care, infrastructure, or anything else critical to his agenda out of Congress. What about the fact they came charging with clubs in hands, swinging clubs, do they have any problem?

White nationalists vs. white supremacists: White nationalists say that white people are a distinct nation deserving of protection, and therefore they demand special political, legal, and territorial guarantees for whites. The Left sees everything Trump says as antithetical to truth and decency; the right sees everything the Left says as motivated by animus and untruth. But the damage done in the last decade by white supremacists and leftist groups such as Antifa are not comparable, data show.

In a series of tweets, she single-handedly trounced CNN's dubious claim.

People on the right and the left both hold prejudices, he said. "The alt-right aims down".

But Oren Segal, director of the Anti-Defamation League's Center on Extremism, said this is simply a rebranding - "a new name for this old hatred".

There's no such thing as the alt-left. The reliance on Nazifying Sanders backers, socialists, anti-fascists, anarchists and a whole host of anti-right, anti-centrist activists fed the toxic ideological stew that made Trump's false equivalency not only possible, but entirely banal.

Hong Kong Activists Jailed For Role In 2014 'Umbrella' Protests
The "umbrella revolution" demands democracy and the right to select the next chief executive of Hong Kong. Law was found guilty of inciting others to take part in an unlawful assembly.

Amidst all the scrutiny of the self-professed "alt-right" neo-Nazis this week, a new term emerged to describe their opponents: the "alt-left". Do they have any semblance of guilt?.

Of the almost 1,500 individuals in a University of Maryland study of radicalization from 1948 to 2013, 43 percent espoused far-right ideologies, compared to 21 percent for the far left. Similar episodes of extreme violence certainly exist on the left: the recent congressional baseball shooting in Virginia, or the bombing of the North Carolina Republican Party headquarters.

A Yahoo! News piece from August 14 takes Antifa's claims that it opposes authoritarian or fascist groups at face value and does not report any critical response to the group. Segal said a popular white supremacist slogan is, "Diversity is a code word for white genocide". For example, James Wolcott, a cultural critic for Vanity Fair, argued in March 2017 that "the "alt-left" provides a mirror image distortion: the same loathing of Clinton, rejection of 'identity politics, ' and itch for a reckoning". Obviously, white supremacists are to blame for the death of a 32-year-old woman when an unhinged neo-Nazi plowed his auto into her and a group of counter-protesters.

Today, the Antifa movement that originally formed in Germany in the 1980s has taken root in the United States, with the goal of rubbing raw social and racial class tensions in order to delegitimize the U.S. Constitution, bring down the Trump administration, and cause the political chaos the Antifa movement believes will lead to the creation of a communist state here in the U.S.A.

During a demonstration Friday night in Charlottesville, white nationalists carried torches and in some cases, wore Nazi symbols and chanted Nazi slogans. Such statements set up a unsafe false equivalency between the people who were present at the protests: one group was combating racism, anti-Semitism, and all other forms of hate that threaten the lives of people of color, Jewish people, and other marginalized communities; the other group was comprised of actual Nazis and Nazi sympathizers.

Essentially, Trump is trying to create a foil for the alt-right-where many of his most vehement supporters have planted their flag.

But the violence was not exclusive to the white supremacists and the neo-Nazis at this weekend's rally as video coverage of the events reveal.

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