Trump 'military' talk on Venezuela unnerves LatAm

Adjust Comment Print

Speaking to Journalists during an impromptu question and answer press conference, President Trump said that the people of Venezuela are suffering, and some are dying. "Military Options" in Latam and the Caribbean".

"We have many options for Venezuela and by the way, I'm not going to rule out a military option", Trump told reporters at his golf club in Bedminster, New Jersey. Leader of the UK's Labour Party, Jeremy Corbyn found himself blasted in the worldwide corporate-owned press for his refusal to denounce Maduro as a dictator and for a lukewarm comment about his opposition of all violence in Venezuela.

Argentina, which has been a big critic of Venezuela's government, spoke about the comments and said that dialogue and democracy were the only ways.

The top US diplomat in Venezuela has arrived to hear what is likely to be a stinging rebuke to President Donald Trump's talk of a possible "military option" to resolve the country's political crisis.

Violent demonstrations vigorously countered by security forces have killed almost 130 people since the beginning of April.

The newly-established Constitutional Assembly of Venezuela announced itself superior to all other governmental institutions, including the opposition-controlled congress.

On Friday evening, Pentagon spokesman Eric Pahon said the Defense Department has not been ordered to make any military movements related to Venezuela - but is prepared for that if need be.

How the US Would Stop Missiles Headed to Guam
But the USA announced Friday it will carry out its annual joint military exercises with South Korea later this month. McMaster, Trump calmed the charged rhetoric of the last week and simply claimed "hopefully it will all work out".

It adds that "the repudiation of violence and any option that implies the use of force is inalienable and constitutes the fundamental basis for democratic coexistence".

Venezuelan Foreign Minister Jorge Arreaza on Saturday said Trump's comments threatened peace and stability in his country.

"The time has come for worldwide organizations and multilateral forums in the region and in the world to reaffirm the validity of the norms of global law and to curb the most aggressive action of the U.S. empire against the Venezuelan people in more than a hundred years".

In response, the White House said Mr Trump would gladly speak to his Venezuelan counterpart, when democracy had been restored in the country.

The crisis has fueled the street demonstrations that have gripped Venezuela for the past four months.

Not even the frustration over Trump's decision to partially roll back Obama's opening to Cuba - a diplomatic thaw that was applauded across the region's political spectrum - or his constant talk of building a border wall to keep out immigrants got in the way of presenting a united front toward Maduro.

The remarks come amid increasing concern about Venezuela and increasing unrest there following a vote that installed a new legislature beholden to Maduro.

Comments