New York Times sues Federal Bureau of Investigation to get notes of Comey-Trump talks

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As head of the FBI, Comey had been leading the investigation until he was sacked by Trump on May 9.

In a series of statements on Twitter Thursday, Trump called special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 campaign a "WITCH HUNT" based on the "phony" premise of possible collusion between Russia and a cadre of Trump campaign associates.

Meanwhile, special counsel Robert Mueller - a respected former Federal Bureau of Investigation director - has sought to beef up his investigatory firepower.

"We could be talking about Cuba".

Trump's Friday tweet was the first official confirmation that he is being investigated by the special counsel over the reasons he fired Comey last month.

Wallace said Trump previously admitted in an NBC News interview that he fired FBI Director James Comey because of the Russian Federation investigation, not because of the recommendation of Rosenstein.

Watch the discussion above. He's increasingly focused his anger at both Rosenstein and Mueller, according to advisers and confidants, viewing the two as part of a biased effort to undermine his presidency.

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The first was for the precise legal meaning of "reasonable doubt", which Judge O'Neill said was a good sign. Constand claims she was ambushed with something that left her feeling "frozen" on Cosby's couch.

Earlier this month, Rosenstein told The Associated Press that "if anything that I did winds up being relevant to his investigation then, as Director Mueller and I discussed, if there's a need from me to recuse, I will". By tweeting that he is under investigation, Trump essentially confirmed Wednesday's Washington Post story which broke the news by leaning on anonymous sources close to the investigation. Rosenstein was also the person who appointed Robert Mueller as a special counsel to head the Russian Federation investigation after Comey was sacked. Though some in the White House have preached caution, fearing a repeat of the firestorm over Comey's firing, many in Trump's orbit - including his son Donald Trump Jr. and adviser Newt Gingrich - have deemed Mueller biased and worthy of dismissal.

If Rosenstein were to recuse himself, Associate Attorney General Rachel Brand - who other than Rosenstein and Sessions is the only other Senate-confirmed official in the entire agency at the moment - would take over his responsibilities.

No matter what Trump does, Rosenstein may very well end up being a witness in Mueller's probe, since be played a pivotal role in the firing that at the center of Mueller's inquiry.

Comey testified before the Senate Intelligence Committee on June 8 that Trump told him in a one-on-one Oval Office meeting on February 14 that he hoped that Comey would let go of the investigation into former National Security Adviser Michael Flynn for making false statements about his conversations with the Russian ambassador. The transition, a nonprofit structurally separate from the Trump campaign, continues to operate with a small staff.

The White House has directed questions to outside legal counsel, which has not responded.

Through a spokesman, Trump's personal attorney, Marc Kasowitz, blasted the Post's report, though he stopped short of denying it. Cohen has received a subpoena from one of the congressional committees looking into the Russian Federation issue.

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