United Nations blasts Pyongyang's latest missile launch

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On Sunday Pyongyang conducted what it said was a successful test of a medium-range ballistic missile.

The United States has been trying to persuade China, North Korea's lone major ally, to do more to rein in North Korea, which has conducted dozens of missile launches and tested two nuclear bombs since the start of previous year, in defiance of U.N. Security Council sanctions and resolutions.

The Security Council responded to that launch with a lengthy statement of condemnation that also threatened to impose fresh sanctions on the North for its "flagrant and provocative defiance" of earlier demands to end all nuclear testing.

He warned that no option is off the table in dealing with the North's weapons program, although Washington has so far opted for sanctions and diplomatic pressure, while looking to China, the North's closest ally, to help rein in Pyongyang.

The US-drafted Security Council statement was agreed on the eve of an emergency meeting requested by the United States, Japan and South Korea to discuss a course of action on North Korea.

The solid-fuel Pukguksong-2 missile flew about 500 kilometers (310 miles) and reached a height of 560 kilometers (350 miles) on Sunday before plunging into the Pacific Ocean.

"These actions threaten regional and global security", United Nations spokesman Stephane Dujarric said.

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North Korea said on Monday that Sunday's launch met all technical requirements that could allow mass-production of the missile, which it calls the Pukguksong-2, although US officials and experts questioned the extent of its progress.

In an interview with "Fox News Sunday", U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson said the ongoing testing is "disappointing" and "disturbing".

Sunday's launch by North Korea was confirmed by the U.S. and Japan.

KCNA said last week's missile test put Hawaii and Alaska within range.

Kim, the North Korean envoy, told Friday's news conference that if the Trump administration wants peace on the Korean Peninsula it should replace the Armistice Agreement that ended the 1950-53 Korean War with a peace accord and halt its anti-North Korea policy, "the root cause of all problems".

The use of solid fuel presents advantages for weapons because the fuel is more stable and can be transported easily in the missile's tank allowing for a launch at very short notice.

The US-drafted statement was almost identical to one adopted last week after the launch of an intermediate-range missile that Pyongyang said was capable of carrying a "heavy" nuclear warhead. Liquid-fuel missiles, on the other hand, are generally fueled at the launch site in a process that can last an hour and requires fueling and other vehicles.

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