NHS works to curtail cyber attack damage

Adjust Comment Print

The attack led to around 40 trusts across the country being shut down by what's known as ransomware - a virus that locks the user out of their computer unless they pay a fee to regain access.

Large swathes of the NHS have been paralysed by the cyber attack, which hit 200,000 victims in 150 countries around the world.

Cyber Security Minister Dan Tehan said on Monday that just three businesses had been hit by the bug, despite worries of widespread infection.

A total 12 out of 14 health boards in Scotland experienced only minor disruptions following Friday's global ransomware attack, with two escaping the attack completely.

Hunt told broadcaster Sky News, the United Kingdom had "never seen a ransomware attack on this scale".

In a blog post late Sunday, Microsoft President Brad Smith appeared to tacitly acknowledge what researchers had already widely concluded: The ransomware attack leveraged a hacking tool, built by the U.S. National Security Agency, that leaked online in April.

"If you have a scheduled appointment you are advised to attend as normal unless you are told otherwise".

Brazil's Supreme Court reportedly authorizes probe into president
Brazil's stock market fell by 10% in early trading this morning, wiping out nearly all of the year's gains in a matter of minutes. Now "those efforts may come to nothing", he warned, calling for a "full and very rapid" investigation at the Supreme Court.

But on Tuesday afternoon the trust confirmed the services would return to normal tomorrow morning.

The cyber attack had a limited impact on some of the x-ray facilities at the hospital, which were temporarily reduced while the machines were repaired.

A cyber virus which caused turmoil within the NHS could have been much worse, a computer expert at the University of Sheffield has claimed.

NHS Digital said health trusts across England were sent details of an IT security patch that would have protected them from the attack.

However, the note said that no GP practice computers had actually been infected by the malware. "Our immediate priority as a government is to disrupt the attack, restore affected services as soon as possible, and establish who was behind it".

The trust, which runs Boston, Lincoln and Grantham hospitals, says to attend "unless patients recieve a telephone call" saying otherwise as some systems are still affected.

Comments