NEW SUPREME COURT JUSTICE - Senate Confirms Judge Neil Gorsuch To Supreme Court

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The Senate voted 54-45 after the Republicans majority changed the rules to no longer require a super majority.

The vote came a day after Republicans used their majority to exercise the "nuclear option", altering Senate rules to defeat a Democratic procedural blockade of the nominee, known as a filibuster.

While Both Republicans and Democrats mourn a loss of collegiality, both sides - except for a few Democrats - voted along party lines to support their parties' escalation tactics.

The US Senate confirmed Neil M Gorsuch to serve on the US Supreme Court, capping more than a year of bitter partisan bickering over the ideological balance of the nation's highest court.

In the 1990s, he worked as a clerk for federal judges, including Supreme Court Justices Byron White and Anthony Kennedy.

By changing rules and fighting forward the GOP party made sure that today, Judge Neil M. Grosuch was confirmed by the senate to become the 113th justice of the Supreme Court.

Senator Manchin was one of only three Democrats to vote in favor of Gorsuch.

Gorsuch fills the seat vacated by Justice Antonin Scalia, who died in February of 2016.

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Some lawmakers have expressed concern by how the fallout of Scalia's death has impacted both the Senate and the Supreme Court.

Mitch McConnell, R-Kentucky, who is now the Senate majority leader, touted the filibuster as "the last legislative check for political minorities and small states".

"Judge Gorsuch is mainstream and he's not going to legislate from the bench". President Donald Trump nominated Gorsuch in late January, roughly a week and a half into his term.

Being among the youngest Supreme Court nominees, Gorsuch has served as an appeals judge for the 10th Circuit in the U.S. state of Colorado since 2006.

Yesterday, Trump himself told to reporters on Air Force One that "there could be as many as four" Supreme Court vacancies for him to fill during his administration.

Senate republicans crushed a democratic blockade of President Trump's Supreme Court nominee Thursday in a fierce partisan brawl.

Tensions escalated further over the past year, when the GOP majority in the Senate refused to hold hearings for then-President Barack Obama's pick to succeed Scalia, Judge Merrick Garland.

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